Реклама | Adv
  • Rotator
  • Rotator
  • Rotator
  • Rotator
  • Rotator
  • Rotator
  • Rotator
  • Rotator
  • Rotator
  • Rotator
  • Rotator
  • Rotator
  • Rotator
  • Rotator
  • Rotator
Сообщения форума
Реклама | Adv

Any one lesson learned in tank design during WW2?

Дата: 27.05.2018 07:06:55
View PostKenshin2kx, on May 24 2018 - 18:03, said:   As I read the balancing factors ... the thought kept popping into my mind ... so, why not a really good/great cannon with the best compromise for armor and speed as mitigated by the most advanced (available) powerplant?  Scratches head, I think I would prioritize the design criteria as such ... (hopefully less confusing than my kneejerk rambling above), IMO the engineer should start with the powerplant first ... determine motive potential  which should indicate weight range limits for intended performance goal for a given amount of armor .. then most advanced cannon.

The_Chieftain:   It is interesting to see the design priorities of the different nations. In the 1930s, the Germans concluded that radius of action trumped gun power which trumped armor. By the time you start talking Panzer III, crew efficiency is thrown in before armor. The full quote is in one of Doyle’s books, at home. (I’m away right now). By 1942, gun power has come to the front of the line but armor is still last. This matches with US tank crew opinion in late 44/45, the demand was always for a better gun. Demand for better armor (notwithstanding the ersatz sandbag efforts sometimes seen) was much lower. In the German case, the thinking was that troops would not be demoralized by meeting a KV, as they had guns to take it (the proposal was rather Firefly-esque, having a few gun tanks,per unit). The Americans had enough faith in their mobility, supporting assets and training that they believed that they didn’t need the armor to win a duel. (A good enough gun would have made the field-added armor irrelevant).  

View Post1Sherman, on May 27 2018 - 03:47, said:   According to one of the more reputable history blogs that people around here like to read, the first time the Brits saw the Tiger I in North Africa they were able to kill it with 57mm AT guns. It wasn't easy, but they did it.

The_Chieftain:   The only working tiger survives today because it was knocked out by 57mm guns, and then sent to the UK.

Реклама | Adv