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T110's Northern Migration

Дата: 04.12.2017 23:28:59
View PostTjtod, on Dec 04 2017 - 19:18, said: the Army-Navy game in the US is played between the academies, USMA vs USNA. Army just broke a 14 year losing streak last year. 

The_Chieftain:   The problem is that American Football is a sport in which sheer physical mass has a significant advantage, and all three major military academies have height/weight standards for entry. This immediately puts them at a disadvantage compared to non-service teams. The Army has an additional problem.   For example, the Air Force won't let anyone into the Academy at 6'4" who weighs more than 221lbs. For comparison, I'm 6'5 and 215. (And getting a little pudgy, I'm trying to lose a couple of inches). Compare with my local team, U-California Bears, their offensive linesman shows as 6'4" and 310lbs. Bears' full team list with height/weight is listed here. http://www.calbears....x?path=football   The Army's problem is that they don't relax the standards for their cadets. A cadet must meet Army standards for height/weight at all times, from admission until they leave the Army. For a 6'4" 20-year-old, the official maxium is 212lbs. There is a taping policy for folks to try to better represent BMI if they exceed that standard, but as a rule of thumb, weight must be kept down.   Air force and Navy waive the standards for their athletes. Once in the academy, football players pour on the pounds. But the standards still exist for graduation. As a result, Navy players will lose over 60lbs in the six months or so between the Army-Navy game and graduation. It's not exactly good or pleasant, but it does give the Navy a very distinct line-up advantage in the Army-Navy game, and thus is a very significant reason why they win so much.

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